Monday, June 27, 2016

Praying the Angelus with Art: This Week's Image

This late 18th century icon shows so much Western influence it is barely an "icon" in the liturgical sense. Is that trapezoidal transparency in Gabriel's robe the traditional "error" in the painting, left to show that no human work can be perfect?

Monday, June 20, 2016

Praying the Angelus with Art: This Week's Image

Early 14th century (French Gothic) clasp from a vestment (cope?) depicts the Annunciation. From the Walters Museum of Art.

Monday, June 13, 2016

Praying the Angelus with Art: This Week's Image


Annunciation by the Master of the Triptych, from the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

About the artist (from the Museum site):
This master is recognized as the enameler of a triptych with a central scene of the Annunciation flanked by donor portraits of Louis XII of France (1462–1515) and his queen, Anne de Bretagne (d. 1514), painted between 1499 and 1514. Now in the Victoria and Albert Museum, London, that triptych is arguably the most beautiful early sixteenth-century Limoges enamel in existence. This plaque is a variant of the London triptych’s central panel.

Workshop of Master of the Triptych of Louis XII
(ca. 1490–ca. 1515)
Date: probably early 16th century
Culture: French, Limoges
Medium: Painted enamel on copper, partly gilt

Monday, June 6, 2016

Praying the Angelus with Art: This Week's Image

The Annunciation, by Mikhail Nesterov 
For a very different rendering of the same scene by the same artist,
see the Angelus Project post from April 4 (this year's Solemnity
of the Annunciation).