Monday, September 18, 2017

Praying the Angelus with Art: This Week's Image


The background of this Annunciation (from a French Book of Hours ca 1375) seems to replicate the halos of Mary and Gabriel, while bursting with leaves as if a continuation of the lily plant between them. From the collection of The Morgan Library and Museum. Gabriel's scroll reads "Gloriae et".

Monday, September 11, 2017

Praying the Angelus with Art: This Week's Image


Veronese's stunning 1558 image can be found in the Basilica of Sts John and Paul ("Zanipolo") in Venice.

Monday, September 4, 2017

Praying the Angelus with Art: This Week's Image


Reduced to the barest minimum: This German Annunciation has no outdoor or indoor setting, no furnishings, no other context for us than the simple words on the ribbons held in the left hand of each: "Ave, Gratia Plena..." and "Ecce Ancilla Domini..."  The almost 1,000 year old image comes from a psalter in the collection of The Morgan Library and Museum.


Monday, August 28, 2017

Praying the Angelus with Art: This Week's Image


The lovely Annunciation by Jan de Beer (mid-16th century) features an unusual addition: a small white cat calmly observing the proceedings from behind the Angel's left arm.

Monday, August 21, 2017

Praying the Angelus with Art: This Week's Image


This 13th century Annunciation with its rosy-cheeked angel and Virgin is from a Psalter in the collection of The Morgan Library and Museum

Monday, August 14, 2017

Praying the Angelus with Art: This Week's Image


This week's Annunciation is a detail from a 13th century Bible page depicting the life of Mary. The right-hand panel depicts the Nativity, while center features the death of the Virgin (a facet of tomorrow's Solemnity of the Assumption). Unseen in this detail are the Flight into Egypt and the Finding of the Child Jesus in the Temple.
From the collection of The Morgan Library and Museum.

Monday, August 7, 2017

Praying the Angelus with Art: This Week's Image


This week's Annunciation is by the Master of the Aix, ca 1445. It is assumed to have originally been part of a triptych.