Monday, December 5, 2016

Praying the Angelus with Art: This Week's Image

This Russian image in ivory and bone is the reverse of an image of St. Nicholas, whose feastday is tomorrow.

Monday, November 28, 2016

Praying the Angelus with Art: This Week's Image

This icon of the Annunciation can be found in the modern
church of St Clement of Ohrid, Skopje, Macedonia.


Monday, November 21, 2016

Praying the Angelus with Art: This Week's Image

Annunciation, Filippo Lippi (1450)

Monday, November 14, 2016

Praying the Angelus with Art: This Week's Image



The Annunciation, Caravaggio (1608)
From Wikipedia: The painting has been considerably damaged and retouched, and what remains of Caravaggio's brushwork is the angel, who bears a resemblance to the figure in John the Baptist at the Fountain. The illusionistic treatment of the angel, floating on his cloud and seeming to protrude outside the picture plane, is more Baroque than is normal for Caravaggio, but the contrast between the energetic pose of the heavenly messenger and the receptive Mary is dramatically and psychologically effective. The loose brushwork is typical of Caravaggio's later period.

Monday, November 7, 2016

Praying the Angelus with Art: This Week's Image

Medieval French crozier  (early 1200’s), enamel on copper.

 
From the Walters Museum of Art: The volute (spiral head) of this crozier resembles a dragon. With a long curving neck covered with blue enamel scales, its grinning head bites at a leafy branch. Inside are the Virgin Mary and the Archangel Gabriel in a scene of the Annunciation. Gabriel's abbreviated greeting "Hail Mary, full of Grace" (Luke 1:28) appears in white enameled letters on each side of the volute. On one side the greeting is misspelled. In Christian symbolism, the dragon represented the Devil who misled mankind, while the Annunciation initiated Christ's birth and human redemption.

Monday, October 31, 2016

Praying the Angelus with Art: This Week's Image

Annunciation, Giovanni Battista Pittoni (1758)

Monday, October 24, 2016

Praying the Angelus with Art: This Week's Image

From the Walters Museum of Art:
This triptych is the finest of the approximately thirty enamels attributed to the Master of the Orléans Triptych, an anonymous artist steeped in the gothicism of the 15th century. The scene of the Annunciation is accompanied by the two prophets David and Isaiah, who hold banderoles with with Old Testament inscriptions. The flesh tones on this triptych are particularly subtle. These were produced by painting a russet-red area on the white ground and placing over this a transparent blue, giving it a violet tinge. By varying the thickness of the opaque white which was applied over this violet area, the artist was able to establish shaded and lighted areas which model the face and hands. The contours of the faces were produced by "enlevage," a process in which either dotted or continuous lines were scratched through the powdery white enamel revealing the darker layer underneath.
Annunciation detail from the triptych.