Monday, April 24, 2017

Praying the Regina Coeli with Art: This Week's Image

Coronation of the Virgin, detail from a book of hours (Master of the Harvard Hannibal, Paris) about 1420–3.

In a medieval prayerbook, "The Coronation of the Virgin introduces compline, the last prayer said before bed. Each of the eight hours was typically illuminated with a scene from Mary's life. Her crowning by Christ was often considered the most appropriate ending image, as she was to sit enthroned at Christ's side for eternity" (from the Getty.edu).

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From Easter to Pentecost, pray the Regina Coeli (in place of the Angelus) three times a day: morning, noon and evening.
The image in its context in the Book of Hours.

Queen of Heaven, rejoice, Alleluia!
R. For he whom you deserved to bear, Alleluia!
Has risen as he said, Alleluia!
R. Pray for us to God, Alleluia!

Rejoice and be glad, O Virgin Mary, Alleluia!
For the Lord has truly risen, Alleluia!

Let us pray:
O God, who gave joy to the world through the resurrection of your Son, our Lord Jesus Christ,
grant, we beseech thee, that through the intercession of his Mother, the Virgin Mary,
we may obtain the joys of everlasting life.
Through the same Christ our Lord. Amen.

Pray it in Latin!
Regina cæli, lætare, alleluia:
R. Quia quem meruisti portare, alleluia,
Resurrexit, sicut dixit, alleluia,
R. Ora pro nobis Deum, alleluia.
Gaude et lætare, Virgo Maria, alleluia.
R. Quia surrexit Dominus vere, alleluia.
Oremus. Deus, qui per resurrectionem Filii tui, Domini nostri Iesu Christi,
mundum lætificare dignatus es:
præsta, quæsumus, ut per eius Genitricem Virginem Mariam,
perpetuæ capiamus gaudia vitæ.
Per eundem Christum Dominum nostrum. R. Amen.

Monday, April 17, 2017

Praying the Regina Coeli with Art: This Week's Image

During the Easter season, we traditionally replace the Angelus prayer with the Regina Coeli. And so Call to Prayer: The Angelus Project will feature images of the Coronation of the Virgin in place of the usual Annunciation.



This relatively small work (10 5/8 by 14 5/8 inches) is attributed to none other than Blessed John of Fiesole, better known as "Fra Angelico." According to the website of the Cleveland Museum of Art, which features this work from the 15th century:
This picture’s original use is uncertain. Its size and shape are appropriate for a predella (the pedestal portion of an altarpiece), which often consists of several small panels. However, the Coronation of the Virgin almost never appears on predellas. The panel’s minute detail and rich finish suggest it may have been an object for private devotion.
.... Here, an angel holds the Virgin’s train while she kneels to receive the crown offered by Christ. The scene glimmers with gold; the thrones are draped with starry tapestries, the walls are hung with gold cloth, and Christ himself radiates light.


From Easter to Pentecost, pray the Regina Coeli (in place of the Angelus) three times a day: morning, noon and evening.

Queen of Heaven, rejoice, Alleluia!
R. For he whom you deserved to bear, Alleluia!
Has risen as he said, Alleluia!
R. Pray for us to God, Alleluia!

Rejoice and be glad, O Virgin Mary, Alleluia!
For the Lord has truly risen, Alleluia!

Let us pray:
O God, who gave joy to the world through the resurrection of your Son, our Lord Jesus Christ,
grant, we beseech thee, that through the intercession of his Mother, the Virgin Mary,
we may obtain the joys of everlasting life.
Through the same Christ our Lord. Amen.

Pray it in Latin!
Regina cæli, lætare, alleluia:
R. Quia quem meruisti portare, alleluia,
Resurrexit, sicut dixit, alleluia,
R. Ora pro nobis Deum, alleluia.
Gaude et lætare, Virgo Maria, alleluia.
R. Quia surrexit Dominus vere, alleluia.
Oremus. Deus, qui per resurrectionem Filii tui, Domini nostri Iesu Christi,
mundum lætificare dignatus es:
præsta, quæsumus, ut per eius Genitricem Virginem Mariam,
perpetuæ capiamus gaudia vitæ.
Per eundem Christum Dominum nostrum. R. Amen.

Monday, April 10, 2017

Praying the Angelus with Art: This Week's Image


My Greek is pretty paltry, but can make out the second and part of the third lines of the text here: "The Gospel of Matins..." (to evanggelion ton orthron). Which is fitting, because this detail from the Hamilton lectionary (Constantinople, late 1000's) is an illustration of Luke 1:24-38. From The Morgan Library and Museum.

Monday, April 3, 2017

Praying the Angelus with Art: This Week's Image

The Annunciation. Gentile da Fabriano, 1425.